Combating climate change

While the scientific debate about ­climate science may be almost over, the economic arguments have just begun. But tackling the issue need not cost the earth, says Lars Josefsson

Communicating the message

Catherine Boiteux Pelletier has overseen a wholesale examination of sustainable development issues at insurance giant Axa. She's now taking a sector-wide view with UNEP FI. Mark Nicholls reports

Why isn't SRI going south?

Investors are placing increasing amounts of capital in emerging markets. But environmental, social and governance considerations inform very little of this investment, and valuable commercial as well as development opportunities are being missed, says Dan Siddy

Heading south

With new sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide rules on the horizon, and carbon controls looming, Abudi Zein sees continuing downward pressure on US emissions allowance prices

Waste not, want not

Waste markets are fragmented, driven by different legislation in different countries, and subject to numerous technology and project-based risks. But the rewards are potentially huge. Felicia Jackson reports

Innovation is king

New trends in the investment world could mean that environmental, social and governance issues become drivers of innovation, rather than niche concerns, argue Ivo Knoepfel and Gordon Hagart

Why ecosystems matter to business.

Business cannot function if ecosystems and the services they deliver – such as water management, biodiversity protection, food provision and climate regulation – are degraded or out of balance, says Björn Stigson

Going green around the edges?

A growing number of companies are offering 'carbon neutral' products or services, either to enhance their reputations or tap into new markets. Philippa Jones talks to some of the trailblazers

Mercury rising.

With the close of HgCapital's €300 million renewables fund, Tom Murley is bringing clean energy to the investment mainstream. Christopher Cundy reports

Raising the bar

While mandatory carbon markets are governed by strict rules and regulations, the voluntary market can sometimes seem like a free-for-all. Mark Kenber looks at efforts to ensure that reductions pass muster